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 HOLI FESTIVAL AND DANCE

Holi is celebrated on the full moon day in the month of Phalguna (Feb-March). Holi in Braja is celebrated for several days, at different places around Braja, before the actual day of Holi.

People throw colored powdered dye and colored water on each other. This is joyfully celebrated in Braja, especially at Varsana, Nandagram and Dauji. In Varsana the festival includes colorful processions with music, song, dance. In Varsana Gopas (men) from Nandagram come to Varsana and play Holi with the local gopis (women) of Varsana.

The women hit the men hard with 7ft long bamboo staffs. The men have shields which they protect themselves with. During this time local songs are sung.

The day after the Holi festival at Varsana, Holi is celebrated in Nandagram. The gopas (men) from Varsana come to Nandagram to play Holi with the gopis (women) there. Women play Holi with bamboo staffs.

The Holika Story

The story centres around an arrogant king Hiranyakashyapu who resents his son Prahlada for worshipping Lord Vishnu. He attempts to kill his son but fails each time. Finally, the king's sister Holika who is said to be immune to burning, sits with the boy in a huge fire.

However, the prince Prahlada emerges unscathed, while his aunt burns to death. Holi commemorates this event from mythology, and huge bonfires are burnt on the eve of Holi as its symbolic representation.

About Lord Krishna

The history of the origin of Holi goes back to Hindu mythology when Lord Krishna killed the demon "Madhu" in ancient Braj or modern Mathura in U.P. Therefore, Lord Krishna who was from Nandagaon and Radha who was from the small town of Barsana are worshiped on this auspicious day.

Holi is spread over 16 days in Vrindavan as well as Mathura - the two cities with which Lord Krishna shared a deep affiliation.

Apart from the usual fun with coloured powder and water, Holi is marked by vibrant processions which are accompanied by folk songs, dances and a general sense of abandoned vitality. It is celebrated with special joy and zest at Mathura, Vrindavan, Nandgaon, and Barsna.

 
 
 
 
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